Photo Set

cross-connect:

Brian Dettmer- a Decade of turning Book Surgery into Art

The richness and depth of the book is universally respected yet often undiscovered as the monopoly of the form and relevance of the information fades over time. The book’s intended function has decreased and the form remains linear in a non-linear world. By altering physical forms of information and shifting preconceived functions, new and unexpected roles emerge. This is the area I currently operate in. Through meticulous excavation or concise alteration I edit or dissect communicative objects or systems such as books, maps, tapes and other media. The medium’s role transforms. Its content is recontextualized and new meanings or interpretations emerge.

                                                       &

(via theashleyclements)

Source: cross-connect
Quote

"Studying History isn’t really about providing answers, it’s about providing context."

Source: storywonker
Photo
robinelizabethartist:

EVERYTHING IS PURGED FROM THIS PAINTING BUT ART, NO IDEAS HAVE ENTERED THIS WORK - John Baldessari, 1966

robinelizabethartist:

EVERYTHING IS PURGED FROM THIS PAINTING BUT ART, NO IDEAS HAVE ENTERED THIS WORK - John Baldessari, 1966

(via absolumentmoderne)

Source: robinelizabethartist
Photo
greatestgeneration:

A welder at a boat-and-sub-building yard adjusts her goggles before resuming work, October, 1943. By 1945, women comprised well over a third of the civilian labor force (in 1940, it was closer to a quarter) and millions of those jobs were filled in factories: building bombers, manufacturing munitions, welding, drilling and riveting for the war effort.

Bernard Hoffma—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
Read more: http://life.time.com/history/world-war-ii-classic-photos-from-the-20th-centurys-defining-conflict/#ixzz2ga3Kp0mp

greatestgeneration:

A welder at a boat-and-sub-building yard adjusts her goggles before resuming work, October, 1943. By 1945, women comprised well over a third of the civilian labor force (in 1940, it was closer to a quarter) and millions of those jobs were filled in factories: building bombers, manufacturing munitions, welding, drilling and riveting for the war effort.

(via silvercistern)

Source: greatestgeneration
Photo Set

artmastered:

Claude Monet, Rouen Cathedral series, 1890s

French Impressionist Claude Monet may be famous for his waterlilies and haystacks series, but he also extensively painted Rouen Cathedral. Typically, Monet was concerned with capturing various conditions of light from different times of the day and year.

Rouen Cathedral features both early and high Gothic aspects. Its massive central steeple meant that the cathedral was named the world’s tallest building from 1876 to 1880. 

Source: artmastered
Photo Set

lb-lee:

homesteadilee:

fer1972:

Three Versions of Judith Beheading Holofernes:

Caravaggio (1571-1610)

Valentin de Boulogne (1591-1632)

Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653)

Princess Judith’s namesake from the Princess and Her Monster.  The Book of Judith is AWESOME.  It’s about a widow (who in that day often fell through the gaps of society) who defies the injunction that women can not wield men’s tools to save her people.  Jael had to use a tent peg, so as to avoid that bit, but nope, Judith uses a sword.

(via rampaigehalseyface)

Source: fer1972
Photo Set

escapekit:

Moses Bridge

This sunken bridge designed by Ro & AD Architects from the Netherlands, has in fact parted waters. The bridge is in the Netherlands and it is the most practical and fun way of accessing the stunning 17th century fortress.

(via rainbowrowell)

Source: jebiga.com
Photo Set

tierradentro:

The Man of Sorrows”, 15th century, Andrea del Verocchio. Taken by me at the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest.

(via caravaggista)

Source: tierradentro
Photo Set
Photo

natgeofound:

Visitors stare in awe at the stained glass windows of Sainte Chapelle in Paris, May 1968.
Photograph by Bruce Dale, National Geographic

(via caravaggista)

Source: natgeofound