Photo
robinelizabethartist:

EVERYTHING IS PURGED FROM THIS PAINTING BUT ART, NO IDEAS HAVE ENTERED THIS WORK - John Baldessari, 1966

robinelizabethartist:

EVERYTHING IS PURGED FROM THIS PAINTING BUT ART, NO IDEAS HAVE ENTERED THIS WORK - John Baldessari, 1966

(via absolumentmoderne)

Source: robinelizabethartist
Photo
greatestgeneration:

A welder at a boat-and-sub-building yard adjusts her goggles before resuming work, October, 1943. By 1945, women comprised well over a third of the civilian labor force (in 1940, it was closer to a quarter) and millions of those jobs were filled in factories: building bombers, manufacturing munitions, welding, drilling and riveting for the war effort.

Bernard Hoffma—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
Read more: http://life.time.com/history/world-war-ii-classic-photos-from-the-20th-centurys-defining-conflict/#ixzz2ga3Kp0mp

greatestgeneration:

A welder at a boat-and-sub-building yard adjusts her goggles before resuming work, October, 1943. By 1945, women comprised well over a third of the civilian labor force (in 1940, it was closer to a quarter) and millions of those jobs were filled in factories: building bombers, manufacturing munitions, welding, drilling and riveting for the war effort.

(via silvercistern)

Source: greatestgeneration
Photo Set

artmastered:

Claude Monet, Rouen Cathedral series, 1890s

French Impressionist Claude Monet may be famous for his waterlilies and haystacks series, but he also extensively painted Rouen Cathedral. Typically, Monet was concerned with capturing various conditions of light from different times of the day and year.

Rouen Cathedral features both early and high Gothic aspects. Its massive central steeple meant that the cathedral was named the world’s tallest building from 1876 to 1880. 

Source: artmastered
Photo Set

lb-lee:

homesteadilee:

fer1972:

Three Versions of Judith Beheading Holofernes:

Caravaggio (1571-1610)

Valentin de Boulogne (1591-1632)

Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-1653)

Princess Judith’s namesake from the Princess and Her Monster.  The Book of Judith is AWESOME.  It’s about a widow (who in that day often fell through the gaps of society) who defies the injunction that women can not wield men’s tools to save her people.  Jael had to use a tent peg, so as to avoid that bit, but nope, Judith uses a sword.

(via rampaigehalseyface)

Source: fer1972
Photo Set

escapekit:

Moses Bridge

This sunken bridge designed by Ro & AD Architects from the Netherlands, has in fact parted waters. The bridge is in the Netherlands and it is the most practical and fun way of accessing the stunning 17th century fortress.

(via rainbowrowell)

Source: jebiga.com
Photo Set

tierradentro:

The Man of Sorrows”, 15th century, Andrea del Verocchio. Taken by me at the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest.

(via caravaggista)

Source: tierradentro
Photo Set
Photo

natgeofound:

Visitors stare in awe at the stained glass windows of Sainte Chapelle in Paris, May 1968.
Photograph by Bruce Dale, National Geographic

(via caravaggista)

Source: natgeofound
Link

Open Content, An Idea Whose Time Has Come |The Getty Iris

caravaggista:

Today the Getty becomes an even more engaged digital citizen, one that shares its collections, research, and knowledge more openly than ever before. We’ve launched the Open Content Program to share, freely and without restriction, as many of the Getty’s digital resources as possible.

The initial focus of the Open Content Program is to make available all images of public domain artworks in the Getty’s collections. Today we’ve taken a first step toward this goal by making roughly 4,600 high-resolution images of the Museum’s collection free to use, modify, and publish for any purpose.

These are high-resolution, reproduction-quality images with embedded metadata, some over 100 megabytes in size. You can browse all available images here, or look for individual “download” links on the Getty Museum’s collection pages. As part of the download, we’ll ask for a very brief description of how you’re planning to use the image. We hope to learn that the images will serve a broad range of needs and projects.

Great news from The Getty!

Huzzah! I like that museums are beginning to do this.

Source: caravaggista
Photo Set

caravaggista:

Théodore Géricault, Severed head studies (c. 1818/9)

If some of the things Géricault did don’t freak you out, I think there may be something wrong.

Source: caravaggista